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that the killing of four americans in benghazi was an act of terror, and how troubled the subsequent investigation into that deadly assault is turning out to be. today, 16 days after the attack, defense secretary leon panetta stated plainly what was obvious to many, including senator john mccain, who joins us shortly, almost from the beginning. >> as we determined the details of what took place there and how that attack took place, that it became clear that there were terrorists who had planned that attack. >> the best we can tell, this is the first time any administration official has uttered the word "planned" to describe what happened. asked how long it took to reach his conclusion, secretary panetta said quote, it took awhile once information from benghazi came back. but keeping them honest, multiple sources now tell "360" that officials knew this was a terror attack almost from the get-go within 24 hours. at least intelligence officials. yet this is what they were saying for more than a week publicly after the killing. >> it's important to know that there's an fbi investigation that has begun
conclusion, secretary panetta said quote, it took awhile once information from benghazi came back. but keeping them honest, multiple sources now tell "360" that officials knew this was a terror attack almost from the get-go within 24 hours. at least intelligence officials. yet this is what they were saying for more than a week publicly after the killing. >> it's important to know that there's an fbi investigation that has begun, and will take some time to be completed. that will tell us with certainty what transpired, but our current best assessment, based on the information that we have at present, is that in fact, what this began as was a spontaneous, not a premeditated, response to what had transpired in cairo. >> now, there are many possible explanations for why the administration took so long to budge from that line. everything from an excess of caution to the fog of war to incompetence or domestic politics. we don't have the answer nailed down on that. what we do have, though, is a collection of inconsistencies between the administration line and our own understanding of the
planning or organization. they are looking at the scene just outside of the consulate in benghazi. tonight, "360" as obtained exclusi exclusi exclusive information about the events leading up to his killing. he talked about being worried about the security threats there. he specifically mentioned the rise in islamic extremism and our source tells us he emailed a journalist in the wake of the bombing in june. he wrote, maybe you should travel to bengazi in light of what appearing to be going on. he wrote and i quote, you should east to benghazi to check out the situation there which appears the be heating up. what we don't know is why, given all that ambassador stevens thought why he travelled with such a light security detail and why he was allowed to? did he want it that way or did the risks go unheeded and he and his people die because of it? at this point we simply don't know. senator john mccain supported the president's steps to oust khadafy, and the president's steps taken since then. i spoke to senator mccain earlier today. senator mccain, a source familiar with the ambassador's thi
-cocked. part of why governor romney looked bad responding to the tragedy in benghazi, he seemed like he was too political and too opportunistic. it could be here that the president was a little too cool. i don't think in his defense for a minute he would say that the murder of an ambassador and other american personnel, much less all the other folks who have died in that region, is just a bump in the road. i think what he's trying to do is show everybody that we're on this, the united states is doing well and you know, i think that's a kind of typical no drama obama response. >> alex, is that what it is, the cool head of the president? >> i think there's something to that, but i think there's also a little more, and that is that this president's great strength is his intellect. he lives inside his head and his ideas. and part of it is he doesn't really feel your pain like paul's former boss, bill clinton, but he can memorize a study about it, you know. people are distant from this president. there's a certain sense of arrogance to this white house that they're just detached from it and i think
she is still waiting for answers while the fbi investigates four americans killing in benghazi, libya. our sources reveal that not single fbi investigators has set foot at the crime scene 15 days after the terrorist attack. and that the crime scene has still not been secured. those are just two headlines, two new pieces of information tonight. that is not all we're learning. cnn national security correspondent fran townsend joins us now. as we often mention, fran is a former white house homeland security adviser and a member of the security adviser committee and was recently in libya with her xworm, mccann drew & forbes. also with us, bob bear and we have the daily beast. you have new reporting. >> so you understand when this happens and the fbi opens the investigation one of the first thing is go to the state department and say, please request permission for to us enter the country, get to the crime scene, benghazi, and please request that we will have the security and the ability to do that, that we will have access to the crime scene, that we will have access to any individuals tha
, on the killing of ambassador christopher stevens and three others in benghazi, libya on 9/11, on what the state department and others may have known about the security situation the days and weeks leading up to their killing, on what leading members of the government have said about their circumstances of the tragedy and whether their statements have lacked clarity or transparency, and of course, on who killed these four dedicated americans. that's where we've always believed the focus should be. however, because cnn discovered ambassador stevens' seven-page journal in what remains of the consulate in benghazi three days after the attack and because it became one source for some of our reporting, questions about the use and handling of that journal have been raised, as you probably heard. as you probably heard this weekend, the u.s. state department spokesman blasted cnn, calling the network's behavior quote, disgusting and our handling of the journal quote, indefensible. now, no one likes to be called disgusting, particularly by a spokesperson for the united states state department. but we do
permission for to us enter the country, get to the crime scene, benghazi, and please request that we will have the security and the ability to do that, that we will have access to the crime scene, that we will have access to any individuals that the libyans take into custody. none of that has -- while the fbi has made that request, we found out from senior law enforcement officials, while the fbi has made it to tripoli, they never made it to benghazi. >> haven't been on the ground in benghazi? >> no, they have no. the fbi has finally made it to tripoli, they haven't been on the ground in bengazi. they deployed their personal to a location in the region. they have conducted interviews of personnel who were there at the time of the attack. they've not been able to get -- gotten as far as tripoli, but not to benghazi. they made a request that the crime scene be secured. as we know from reporting, the state department -- we don't know whether that request was put to the libyans and whether that was denied. what happened to it. what we know for sure, the crime scene was never secured, and
investigators still have not set foot in the ruins of the american consulate in benghazi, libya, tonight we're the first to tell you why. tonight, we have the likely reason and we have it from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens. that was two and a half weeks ago. two and a half weeks that have seen the administration first describe this as a spontaneous outburst even though our reporting revealed that officials knew within 24 hours that it was not. only much later did they back away from that assessment. today, the director of national intelligence, james clapper, put out a statement explaining that early evidence supported that theory so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says that throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our sources specify a time frame for the dni's change of view. again, our sources tell us that law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours that this was a
in the ruins of the american consulate of benghazi, libya. tonight, we're the first it tell you why. the likely reason and from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens, that was 2 1/2 weeks ago, 2 1/2 weeks, that saw the administration describe this first as a spontaneous outburst, even though reporting shows that officials knew within 24 hours it was not. today the director of national intelligence, james clapper, explained early evidence supported that theory, so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our source have a time frame. law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours this was a terror attack. reporting reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is going smoothing, the fbi has hit a bump in the road. a senior law enforcement official, telling fran townsend, the fbi wanted the u.s. military to provide perimeter
ambassador stevens' seven-page journal in what remains of the consulate in benghazi three days after the attacknd b it became one source for some of our reporting, questions about the use and handling oft journal haveeen raised,s you probably heard. as you probably heard this weekend, the u.s. state spkesman blasted cnn, calli the network's behavior quote, disgusting and our handling of thernal quote, indensible. w, no onlikes be called disgusting, particularly by a spespers f united states state deptment. but do invite you and tem t ho us to the sametandards that whold others and try every night to meet ourselves. out of respect for his family, we have not quoted from his journal, not once. ambassador stevens' journal. it was not e-mailed around the newsroom as the u.s. state department spokesman said it was. remember, cnn discovered the journal three days after the assault. arwa damon, one of the best war correspondents i ever worked with who reported for years at great personal risk to herself, discovered the journal. why was the journal significant? well, at the time that cnn d
to provide perimeter support in benghazi, protection, in other words, but that request was not granted. fran's a former white house homeland security advisor. she served in the george w. bush administration, currently she sits on the cia external advisory panel and recently visited libya with her employer, mcandrews and forbes. also joining us, former fbi assistant director, tom fuentes, who has extensive experience investigating attacks on americans overseas, and former cia officer, bob baer. so fran, so the fbi sought military protection to go into benghazi. why didn't they get it? >> well, the answer to that question, i think, is not really clear. so it's not unusual, when you want to set up a security perimeter, you may look to the host country. if the host country is unable or unwilling to provide it, we don't know what the answer to that is, y may ask if you think you need it for u.s. military support, but that's got to go through a process. it needs state department and nsc support, the u.s. military would have to make an assessment about how big a security package that would entail a
apart from other nations. this was their work in benghazi and this is the work we will carry on. >> president obama today talking of the mission that so many americans do and what four american died doing. we put them front and center tonight. ambassador christopher stevens, sean smith, glen doherty and tyrone woods. joining me on the phone is ambassador stevens' stepfather. i am so sorry for your loss and please extend our condolences to your entire family. what do you want people to know about your stepson? >> well, i think what you learn today, it tells me what his legacy was at the anderson air force base when the caskets were brought back, 800 members of the state department were there and the president for the first time he spoke at one of these ceremonial dignified transfers and secretary clinton spoke and they all expressed the understanding that chris's commitment to libya and to the country has left a legacy that will live after him. so this is what i'd like people to know, that he was beloved by his colleagues in the state department and from the people of libya. the
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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